How did John F. Kennedy Actually Die?

Written by: Davina

Everyone has probably heard of the story of the assassination of John F. Kennedy. But to those who still don’t know what took place on the 22nd of November in 1963, John F. Kennedy, who was the president of the U.S. at the time, was assassinated. Whilst travelling through Dallas in a limousine with an opened-top, he was shot and fatally wounded. Eventually, Kennedy died in Dallas’ Parkland Hospital 30 minutes later. 

It was believed that a former U.S. marine by the name of Lee Harvey Oswald was the killer and allegedly fired 3 shots at the President. Apparently, Kennedy was not the only victim he shot, he also shot a policeman who had questioned him less than an hour before he shot Kennedy. Oswald was then arrested. But, on his way to a more secure jail, he too was shot and wounded badly. The killer was Jack Ruby who shot Oswald with a .38 revolver. Ruby was arrested. When questioned what the motive was for his murder, he said that it was due to his rage at the death of Kennedy. 

Now, you might think that the story is pretty clear: Oswald shot Kennedy, Oswald was arrested, Ruby shot Oswald and Ruby was arrested. Seems plain and simple, no? Well, it’s not. Theories have started to rise that Oswald was actually a hit man and was hired by Ruby to assassinate President Kennedy. In fear of Oswald spilling important information to the police about who had hired him and told him to kill Kennedy, Ruby took matters into his own hands and decided to end the life of Oswald in order to cover up any other secrets.

Another conspiracy was not about the killers, but how the bullets struck two people: John F. Kennedy and the Governor John Connally. Connally was sitting in the front seat of the limousine, Kennedy was directly behind him. This theory is called the ‘magic bullet theory’, it is believed that both men were struck by the same bullet. It was theorised that it entered Kennedy’s body from the upper back and went out through his throat. The very same bullet then struck Connally, destroying his ribs and wrist, and eventually exiting and going back into his thigh. The suspected trajectory of the bullet was claimed to be plain ridiculous and unrealistic since the path of the bullet is just impossible. This theory was easily dismissed as an actual reason but numerous witnesses claimed this is what they saw happened.

Fun fkjsdf.pngact: the movie ‘X-Men Days of Future Past’ made a reference to the assassination and explained how it was Magneto who killed Kennedy and used his powers to redirect the bullet, making it strike two people.

An interesting mystery is related to the story of the Babushka Lady. She was one of the witnesses and was given the nickname ‘Babushka Lady’ because of the headscarf she wore. It was said that she was one of the closest people to the limousine when the shooting took place. Throughout a recording of the assassination, the Babushka Lady seemed to be filming the event. When Kennedy was shot, everyone else ran away from the scene… except for the lady who didn’t seem a bit surprised and kept filming the event. The identity of Babushka Lady still remains unknown.

After reading this article, what do you suppose is the real story? Do you think the conspiracies are just bonkers, or do you believe that there could be more to uncover? Leave your thoughts in the comments.

Bibliography:

Research:

“The Mystery of The Babushka Lady”. (26th March 2016) Alltime Conspiracies.

History, UNKNOWN. 1963 – John F. Kennedy assassinated. Available at: http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/john-f-kennedy-assassinated (10th November 2016)

The Week, 2016. Who killed JFK? The Kennedy conspiracy theories explained. Available at: http://www.theweek.co.uk/55933/who-killed-jfk-the-kennedy-conspiracy-theories-explained (10th November 2016)

Images:

GOLDMAN, Scott, 2013. JFK Assassination: Famous front pages, 50 years later. Available at: http://www.oregonlive.com/politics/index.ssf/2013/11/jfk_assassination_famous_front.html (12th November 2016)

Wikipedia – The Free Encyclopedia, UNKNOWN. Single-bullet theory. Available at: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Single-bullet_theory  (14th November 2016)

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